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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to be having the kind of conversations we are having now that you would have before the civil rights act of 1964 was passed and before the voting rights act. . tavis: is this a short-term strategy or long term? is this a strategy to get rid of barack obama, the first african american president? or is this a strategy they think it can win long-term for them, the strategy of voter suppression? >> i think they are playing a short-term game. it is not just about president obama but holding power every level of the electoral process. but i think what they are betting now is that some of these demographic changes are still in their infancy and we do not know yet what kind of turn out there will be among younger and hispanic voters and african americans, not only in 2012 and the gop is betting they can manipulate the electoral process in such a way that they could reduce turn out on the margins. if you look of the voter i.d. laws, the literature shows that the laws can depress voter turnout by three percentage points. that is enough to swing a close election. and they are betting that at least
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice marshall -- attorney 30 marshall's -- ternate thurgood marshall -- attor
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
, this civil rights attorney told kron 4 haazig madyun that this could raise some serious questions. >> this officer pointed the firearm and he heard 3-4 different gun shots. >> there is conflict in the testimony that the state was given. >> the oakland police department has released the crime report of 18 year-old bluuferd, the statement from the witnesses of the scene are raising red flags. >> on the on september statements that there was gunfire. perhaps that the 18 year-old fired gunfire however the evidence shows that there's no gunshots fired. and that the gun found near him was not fired. whoever made that statement has been quoted wrong. >> and obviously the fact is that he was not on probation. that probably prompte him to run however, what the family has gone through that he and anny would have pointed a fire arm at an officer. at a time like this. when he said that he has not done anything. in any got shot. >> in oakland haazig madyun kron 4. >>pam: half t statement released with a crime report that " this release is not intended to address all questions and criticisms th
. >>> president obama's in california attending fund-raisers and honoring the late labor and civil rights actist cesar chavez. our white house correspondent dan lothian is traveling with the president right now. what's the latest areaction coming from the obama campaign? >> reporter: first of all, the president himself has not reacted to that speech by mitt romney. but last night at a major fund-raiser in los angeles, he was flexing his foreign policy muscles right off the top of his remarks, he was talking about how he ended the war in iraq, how he's winding down the war in afghanistan, how he's gone after terrorists, how he got osama bin laden. those are just some examples, says his campaign, of strong leadership. as president obama honored civil rights icon cesar chavez -- >> the movement he helped to lead was sustained by a generation of organizers who stood up and spoke out and urged others to do the same. >> reporter: his campaign worked to shred gop nominee mitt romney's foreign policy chops, rolling out this hard-hitting web ad reminding voters of what they called stumbles on the world s
. contrast that with a judge that was blocked by the democrats on civil rights grounds because he was not on abortion. it has nothing to do with black people anymore. who was i talking about? host: charles pickering. guest: he was a prosecutor prosecuting the klan. he was putting his life at jeopardy and sent his kids to public schools. not white liberals. host: this is missy in buffalo. good morning. caller: i think you're brilliant. you are my role model. i just wanted to say that and i can wait to read your book. i know your book covers the 1970's and 1980's. the one topic they bring up with republicans is slavery. the republicans had a huge role in ending slavery, they still use that as a talking point against our party. guest: and the apocryphal southern strategy. that is the most amazing rewrite in history. in my third book, a large part of that was telling the truth of joe mccarthy. that covered about five years. liberals have reread the history to cover 200 years. republicans or the party to talk about slavery. it was for the next 100 years with platforms endorsing justice
of violating their civil rights by coercing their confessions. the city has defended 9 way it's conducted its investigation. the filmmaker refuse to share outtakes citing shield laws. >> we believe we are protected under the shield laws as journalists and we don't think it's fair for the government to intrude in our research. >> reporter: a lawyer for the city says the film isn't journalism because it advocates for the five. in a statement, the city says, quote, if the plaintiffs truly want an open airing of the facts, they should encourage the filmmakers not to hide anything. the filmmakers claim the documentary sticks to the facts. what do you make of the city trying to go after the outtakes for this film? >> the city needs to stop dragging their feet. i don't think they would find anything other than what they already know, that we were innocent and this is just going to continue to further restate that. >> reporter: yusef says no matter the outcome, he may never fully escape his nightmare that started in in park. susan candiotti, cnn, new york. >>> the world watches cape canaveral, florid
years ago. it brought together civil rights leaders then and now. i was too young in '65, so were you, but we're not too young now. we must maintain what they won in '65. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> does romney like you? let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. on the way to denver. let me start with this brand new nbc/wall street journal poll out tonight. what it shows in addition to an obama leading that's hardening is a deep concern that mitt romney said about that 47% of the country he says can't be counted on to meet its responsibility. it's that part of the country that romney has dismissed as free-loaders, moochers, takers. people, especially veteran families, people retired on social security, regular americans, that is, don't like being dismissed that way, injury added by insult. i'm joined by chuck todd and howard fineman with "the huffington post." the latest poll shows among likely voters the president leads 49% to 46% for romney. that's down net two points from two weeks ago when the pres
in florida but around the country? and all of the fingers kept pointing back to alec. >> when civil rights and grassroots groups learned about alec's connection to stand your ground laws, they were outraged. >> alec doesn't do its work alone, they do it with some of the biggest corporate brands in america. >> before long, corporations were pulling out of alec, including coca-cola, kraft foods, mcdonald's, marsproctor & gamble, johnson & johnson. caught in the glare of the national spotlight, alec tried to change the subject. >> you know, i think the entire debate needs to be reframed, and really what alec is, is a bipartisan association of state legislators -- we have legislators of all political stripes coming together to talk about the most critical issues facing the states and trying to come up with the best solutions to face some of the problems that we're having. >> alright, so your point is it's not a partisan organization. >> but alec is partisan. and then some. >> in the spring i got a call from a person who said that all of the alec bills were available and was i interested in loo
for looking at all these forces that were set in motion, women's rights, civil rights, all wedded to what i hope to be a very captivating yarn about a detective and his wife who come into possession of two diaries that offer secrets about the lincoln assassination. >> tim, lincoln is hot to death right now. there's your book about lincoln, steven carter wrote a book "the impeachment of abe lincoln." there was a movie "lincoln vampire hunter. qrequesting requesting of course, the daniel day-lewis movie which comes out next month. >> congress must never declare equal those who god created unequal. >> leave the constitution alone. >> stepped out on the world's stage with the fate of human dignity in our hands. blood has been spilled to afford us this moment, now, now, now. he really looks like lincoln, but the question is why is lincoln so hot right now? >> i think lincoln has always been hot. he's one of those mythical figures in american history, and i think we as a society revisit him from time to time because he's so compelling, and i think the lincoln conspiracy is an effort to recapture
of murdering 12 people, james holmes says he's the victim? his civil rights are being violated? then they voted for obama in 2008. what are they thinking now after last night's debate? frank luntz up next with the fascinating revelation. right back. i've been a superintendent for 30 some years at many different park service units across the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. >> steve: i love being here in the control room. news by the numbers. $127,000. that's the value of all the jewelry swiped from julianne moore's new york city apartment. the heist happened while the actress was filming a movie in canada. next, one dollar a day. that's how much manhattan teen-agers are paid for cell phone have lays. d -- valets. let's them leave their phones inside while they go to school. $5,600, that's how much virginia car dealership accidentally cut from the price of this chevy suv. but when the custo
's civil rights, workers rights, or women's rights where people remember why unioners created. most of the world has no rex why it happened. you had to work 18 hours and never got overtime. you got paid a number you live in a town which you work. people don't understand where the value base came from. there is going to be an evolution or innovation in the movement. i see union doing all kinds of interesting thing. don't corporate affairs work they follow pension resources and they take their own money and create economic development. that's smart. looking how do i get economic activity get my folks. ensure my rate of return. do something to get the economy to move again. i think there's a lot of compelling unions that are think abouting it circhtly. to underestimate the kind of [inaudible] >> i would say one thing to watch political any in the jersey we come from a unionized state than a lot of states in the south. the union have different power and i think one of the things that is important to watch you saw it in wisconsin and you see in other places it's a growing system between
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
? >> wow. >> before the civil rights act was passed was the last time we had a president from massachusetts win ask i'm not saying mitt romney is a bad guy. i'm sure he's a nice guy, but i will say that if i was going to write a movie and create a bad guy orvilleen, i would have them be a really, really wealthy out of touch guy who stashes his money in cayman bank accounts and fires people for a living. >> you know, because he likes to fire people. >> he likes being able to fire people. >> and get him -- get him a car garage for his vacation home. >> car elevator. >> elevator, yes car elevator. there are so many things about mitt romney. we could go on and on. i'm sure i's a very nice man has a good family. i saw his sons out in iowa. there's something that disturbs me about the way mitt romney is running for president. it's almost like he wants to go back in time. i saw him and he would talk about how great america was and barack obama wants to change america to make it great. i want to go back to what made america great in the past. it's like he wants to go back to some time period when h
of the poor and study the indifference to civil rights. a lot who lived through it seemed to think the best thing about george bush, he is not ronald reagan. ♪ ♪ >> largely as as a result of the policy and priority of reagan administration, more people are becoming poor and staying poor in the country than many times since world war ii. ♪ >> if there's anything left ronald reagan trickle down theory it seems to be anxiety which seems to be trickle down through every segment of our society. ♪ if you give complearns thomas a little flower you think you have david talking. here is a man who is against everything that has lifted the level of life of -- [inaudible] ♪ i egg and butter many black men do a [inaudible] >> has hard too. he's remember rehenceble person. ♪ your words trickle down terrorist who face their agenda on division, exclusion, and fear. do you think middle class americans are in need of protection. ♪ the new republican majority congress took a big step on the legislative agenda to demolish or damage government-aid programs many of them designed to help children an
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
. >> on that one? on the issue of civil rights? >> i will absolutely differ from my party. i am pro-choice candidate, i believe in equal rights for all. i would have voted to repeal don't ask, don't tell. i don't think we should have discrimination in the military, the workplace or anywhere. >> our next question is to mr. murphy. >> knowing that voters form their opinions based on political ads, how can you justify airing ads that in some cases have been determined by fact checkers to be misleading, confusing, and downright inaccurate? >> the ads that you see on tv for me right now are me in my kitchen talking to voters directly about the differences between me and linda mcmahon on critical issues. i support a middle-class tax cut. when the mcmahon includes a tax cut for the very wealthy. when history is standing up for the people in the state, whether it's taking homeless veterans of the street and giving them housing or fighting for the most vulnerable and the roof over their head because of a disability or mental illness. linda mcmahon has used her job a very different way, going
johnson because he will reduce the debt and preserve our civil rights and respect the constitution. >> i am supporting president obama because he is doing a good job and he deserves another term so he can experiences policies coming into fruition. that has been full of broken promises so i will be voting for governor romney. >> i will be supporting jerry johnson for president because he is the only candidate that will focus on the constitution, stay out of the made wars. at the end of the war on drugs. >> live coverage tonight from the presidential debate. the debates starting at 9:00 p.m. eastern time. at the next debate between the presidential candidates on tuesday the sixteenth where they will take audience questions in new york city. in the final debate, the questions will focus on that the bay. will have live coverage online at c-span.org. >> we need to tackle our nation's challenges before they tackle us. we need to strengthen medicare and social security. we're putting ideas on the table headed to that. we are not trying to scare seniors, we are trying to save seniors. >> they ha
, we have the worst civil rights violation in mississippi and the correction in the local and state government in mississippi. lives are being hurt. children are being kidnapped. i was very motivated to your mitt romney talk about the first amendment. >> we will get a couple more calls. back to our twitter stream. -- her ee is one this one says -- ours go to a caller on democrat line. go ahead. caller: i am a registered democrat. i am on a fixed income. i worry about our medicare and social security. people are on fixed incomes and depend on social security and medicare. i will vote for mitt romney. i feel that he is the one to straighten out this country and the mess that it is in. i voted for a bomb at of years ago and i am very disappointed in him -- obama four years ago and i am very disappointed in him. >> what made you decide to vote for mitt romney? >> i think he is the only one who could really get us out of this position that we are in. it can go on like this. i am against obama for what he did and taking 4 $5 billion out of our medicare system and putting it into obamacare
written right after the civil war. >> what's this mean on the ground for people voting? i was worried about this law. now i'm worried people still think the law is in effect. it's called intimidation, not just suppression. >> it was a huge victory today, chris, like your other guests, and i think them for their partnership and i thank everybody for helping us to push this thing back past november 6th. our game now has transformed somewhat. because there's a portion of this that the judge allowed. that is that the government here in pennsylvania can still talk about the law even though it's not to be implemented. so our game, chris, has shifted. we're going to remind voters you do not need identification to vote because i suspect in the next five weeks, mr. corbett, mr. romney, mr. turzei, mr. metcalfe and their friends will attempt to create confusion and chaos now that we beat this back. we're going to be just as vigorous now as we have been. your prior guest on the prior segment talked about anger. let me tell you something, chris, there's a lot of angry voters in pennsylvania. mitt
of the plaintiff lawsuits. >> sure does. >> plaintiff attorneys brought the exact same civil case. >> right. >> why do we think this is going to be a new model for anything? >> they say it's a model for the feds and the state attorneys general to work together. new york has this martin act that other attorneys generally in new york have used quite a bit in the past. >> to the extent that they bring more cases like this, civil cases, do you think this does anything to feed the public's lust for whatever you think, whatever you think president obama was trying to go for a year ago when he created this group in. >> if the public is lusting for ceos being perp walked over the financial crieses they're not going to get it with this and may not ever because they haven't been able to build the criminal cases, they're tough to make, if there was criminal conduct you have to get the lower executives to plead or cooperate. >> is there anything to indicate there are criminal cases that could come from these things in. >> this doesn't read like a criminal case. it reads like a civil case, like a lot of the pla
state, psychologists, civil attorneys and other accusers. they won. >> you have a brand new statement from one of sandusky's victims? >> reporter: that's right. some of them will address the court directly. others will have statements read for them. but this is an exserpt from a victim who will speak in court and it says in part i hope and pray that when your honor sentences mr. sandusky you consider the real harm he's done to me and others and take into account the tears, pain and private anguish and others have suffered. again we'll hear from him as well as some others too. >> susan, what about the jurors? they were the ones who rendered this decision. i understand you spoke to one. >> reporter: that's right. they want closure too. this juror says she knows of at least four all together who will be here in the courtroom. what do they want to hear? they want to hear an apology. doesn't sound like they will get one. >> susan candiotti -- >> like to hear him say he's sorry and i want him to apologize and to recognize that what he did was wrong. but i don't believe that's what i'm going
. is it hard? sometimes. is it is agreeable? sometimes. is it the right thing? all the time. i bet if we can get lincoln to come back and we could ask him how hard the civil war was and how hard being president was whether or not he would say to you if it was worth it but i am willing to bet that if you were to ask washington to come back and asked him whether it was leaving the family to fight at valley forge you say it is worth mount vernon to leave to go to the constitutional convention. you would say it is worth it to leave to become president. you would say it is worth it. all of the absentees, all of the day's i think they would say at. i am booker t. washington, frederick douglass, and i keep those around me to remind me what our obligations are. yours and mine. >> the first time i think i heard you you were talking of the declaration of independent which mr. lincoln a alludes to write out of the gate in the gettysburg address. that's 1863 kutz 1776 when you do the math. many quotes from the declaration and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal that is the langua
's he doing? writing notes for the next debate? >> right. >> yeah. the split screens were jarring a little bit. one thing to point out, it may not amount to much, but it's worth mentioning is it was a remarkably not only substantive but civil debate. the way they came out. mitt romney's congratulations about the anniversary felt heartfelt. the way that president obama looked at him and nodded quite often. they went at it. they had a smart intellectual debate, but they did it in a civil way. and the one thing, though, that was not there that we took for granted was the 47% comment. i thought that was going to be the theme of the debate. >> my god, why not hammer that home? >> why not? why not? >> the bain record. there were a lot of things. i think part of the thing that's going on with president obama was, a lot of his debate prep was designed to make sure that he preserved his main asset in this race, which is his likability. that they know how important that is. he doesn't really like mitt romney at all. he has a lot of contempt for romney. and i think a lot of his preparation w
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)